Skip to main content

About your Search

20091101
20091130
STATION
CSPAN 25
CNN 24
FOXNEWS 21
HLN 18
MSNBC 15
WHUT (Howard University Television) 11
WETA 9
WMPT (PBS) 8
WJLA (ABC) 5
WMAR (ABC) 5
WRC (NBC) 5
WBAL (NBC) 4
WUSA (CBS) 3
WJZ (CBS) 2
CSPAN2 1
WTTG 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 157
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
and come to the united states and harm us physically or our nato allies or others. that's our quest. now can that quest be coupled with the ideas for nato -- schools, building a police force that is not corrupt, but also is efficient, and to do this in a country in which the literacy rate is so low, the poverty is so endemocratic. the whole traditions of dealing with money as to who your friends were is really so much a part of just existing. i think for the moment, the president from press accounts is looking at it province by province. he's looking at being in the medium-sized cities as well as the hamlets in the country. how does this match up with what we are doing with a line drawn by europeans a long time ago to divide the countries? do we understand the poshtoon culture? well, yes and no, and we're all learning fast, including the president, but i think we are learning. if the president does come forward with a plan or plans, he must make that very specific. and that is a very big quest. it will not do to have a tentative feeling that now you see if, now you don't, and this is amo
in israel is likely to increase and the pressure from israel on the united states is very likely to increase. but we have seen in the past that there are precedents that the united states can prevent israel from taking military action, precisely because of the fact that israeli military action against iran would spell disaster for the united states in the region, which has been made very clear by admiral mullen, as well as other military figures in the u.s. so in the past we've seen examples in which the united states actually has successfully prevented israel from taking military action. >> thank you. >>> let's talk about the economy now. the chairman of the federal reserve goes before a senate committee this week as lawmakers consider a second term for ben bernanke. he's getting a headstart on the discussion with an opinion column in today's "washington post." bernanke argues against several moves under way in congress designed to limit the central bank's independence. bernanke's words, we should be seeking to preserve, not degrade, the institution's ability to foster financial stability a
that this is not an unending responsibility of the united states without limit. senator lugar pointed out the issue of cost. you know, we have over eight years in iraq and afghanistan under the bush administration not paid for any of those military operations. now that is coming home to reckon in terms of the huge deficit. we have to move forward and support this operation responsibly. but the president -- i think the key to the president's response is laying down a strategy, informing the american public of what's at stake, and i think that when they listen and when they hear, they will be supportive, but it will be a support that has to be continually developed and strengthened going forward. >> you've both mentioned the cost. let me ask you, we're going to talk to chairman david obey of the house proportions committee later in the program. he wants a special war surtax, wants it laid out, so the american people know, here's what's going to pay for iraq and afghanistan. senator reed, to you first, do you support that? do you think it should be broken out separately so the american people get a separate b
the united states' mission and its allies' mission going forward? >> in the larger sense, of course, the mission really depends on a great deal more than just corruption, although that is certainly a concern here. mcchrystal, i think, is prepared now to accept some redefinition of what the counterinsgency strategy is going to be. that is doing the same with fewer troops or narrowing the mission somewhat. but, again, president karzai, it seems to me, is really of the opinion that the united states is really stuck with them and that his election has given the united states no real alternative. therefore, he has the latitude to really take this as a rate of change that he would like and one that we probably would not like. >> what's the blueprint here? >> the blueprint essentially is to be able to do the basics of what counterinsurgency requires and that is to be able to protect large population centers and to devote most of our energies now into regaining the confidence of the afghan people. unfortunately, karzai's actions in recent times, not just corruption, but failure to deliver b
for abbas. >> translator: the stated position of the united states in relation to settlements in the annexation of jerusalem have been well-known and appreciated by us. however, we were surprised by their favoring of the israeli position. >> reporter: but obama's been talking up a possible breakthrough in middle east peace going back before his cairo speech. palestinians fear obama won't be able to encourage israel to make the other compromises necessary to complete a final peace deal. a leading palestinian candidate to fill abbas' shoes put it this way -- >> i think this announcement is a declaration of the failure of efforts for true peace process, due to the israeli policy of expanding and continuing settlements and the failure of the united states to take an impartial position. >> reporter: now abbas has had enou and said he won't stand for re-election. it remains to be seen if the u.s. moves to try to keep him or prefers to look to the future withnother palestinian head of state, in the early part of next year. john tarat, al jazeera, washington. >> for more on the middle
that was licensed in the united states. we have done those things. we have shifted all the vaccine manufacturing to the extent we can to multi those virus first because there faster to fill, with leaving the rest of leftover for the single dose syringes. we have worked with them to shift everything they can do to get the vaccine out as fast as they possibly can. then we are tracking through the process step by step. to the degree that when a lot is ready to be released at a manufacturer, we have a truck waiting. it pulls up at the loading dock ready to accept that vaccine and bring it to the distribution sites. if we have been working through this every step of the process to get any delays out. that is what a sight visits have largely been about. >> a question about the contracts. [unintelligible] to produce this reject all under 51 million doses, kabbalah contracted the manufacturers to fill 117 million doses. why aren't they able to undo the full amount of doses -- able to do the full amount of doses? >> we need to make sure we have enough vaccine derived the time people want it and being ca
to you first, what is the single biggest challenge for the president of the united states when he speaks to the united states, ed rollins? >> how long we're going to be there and equally as important what is the mission and how is the mission different than it was two years ago or four years ago. dechl democrats have to be convinced the president's party is very divided on this issue. i think he'll have the republican support he needs, but at the end of day, if this is not a bipartisan effort long-term they won't get the resources and funding to make it work. >> donna brazile, to ed rollins' point, the toughest sales job is the anti-war left of the democratic party. how does the president convince them to support him or keep quiet of the criticism? >> public support of the war has diminished across the board not just with the left, across the country and even across the world where we depend on troops from other countries to help us in afghanistan. the president gave a very thorough speech back in march, laying out our objectives. he said it was to dismantle, disrupt and destroy al qaeda
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
think if you add up the troops that the united states will commit as well as those that nato countries are going to commit and that's still a work in progress on the latter. i'm told by senior defense officials that general mcchrystal will be more or less satisfied with the number that he believes he needs to do the counterinsurgency campaign that he laid out in his strategic assessment earlier this year. >> suarez: now, it takes a while to get everybody deployed, doesn't it? >> it does. it will take several months, actually several weeks for the first troops. but the marines that you mentioned will be going in first early next year to be followed soon after by a number of... several hundred perhaps up to a thousand army trainers. these will be doing the initial training of afghan recruits. the recruits will then be put into their units and partnered with american units on the ground. this will be a phased deployment going over the next 12 to 18 months. the troops that you mention in your broadcast, up to some 30,000 or so will be phased in over that time frame. >> suarez: once all tho
hopelessly deadlocked, can a new jewish lobby here in the united states shake up the status quo in washington, put its stamp on u.s. policy and rival apac? jeremy ben-ami sits down with me for a face-to-face debate on u.s.-israel policy with a member of the old guard. we begin with jay street. take a look at who addressed its opening national conference. >> mr. ben-ami, friends, i'm delighted to have this chance to say a few words to you tonight. let me congratulate you all on this important gathering. your theme says it all. driving change, securing peace. for too long we have not driven change. the palestinian-israeli conflict goes on into a seventh decade. peace has not been secured. and neither side has security. >> king abdullah of jordan is one of america's key allies, and never before has an arab head of state addressed the national conference of a major jewish lobby. so is the balance of power about to shift? i sat down with jeremy ben-ami, executive director of j street and david harris, the executive director of the ajc, american jewish committee. we did invited aipac to participate
number of people in the united states who are related to each other and we just don't know it. >> tonight the woman who uncovered michelle obama's family ties will give us more detail and dig into my own roots. >> this, for example, is your grandmother. >>> this is your only source for news, cnn prime time begins now. here's campbell brown. >>> hi there, everybody. we start tonight, as always, with the mashup. we're watching it all so you don't have to and tonight after weeks of debate at the white house about what to do in afghanistan, the president has made a decision. the pentagon right now is drawing up plans to send about 34,000 u.s. troops to afghanistan and what that means is that young men and women from around the country will be packing up and shipping out very soon. president obama is expected to make the official announcement next tuesday in a prime time address. >> it is my intention to finish the job, and i feel confident when the american people hear a clear rationale for what we're doing there and how we intend to achieve our goals that they will be supportive. >> i antici
that we have had the highest deficit in the history of the united states, $1. trillion, -- the $1.4 trillion, the pelosi plan comes in weighing at $1 trillion. when we just got unemployment figures back, think about this, the president with an 8.5% unemployment rate pushes upon the congress a $787 billion stimulus bill and now unemployment has gone from 8.5% to 10.2% and in so many other pockets of america it's 14%, 15% and 16%. where are the jobs? why have we taken the focus off the main thing, the economy? why are we going down the track of government takeover of health care? and massive mandates on individuals, doctors and small businesses? just like china. mr. speaker, 1,900 pages, it's ridiculous. the republican alternative, which is not even half, not even 25%, but i'd say maybe 15% in size, weighing in at say maybe a mere $1 -- 150 pages, bring more competition for individuals, association health care plan to let small businesses pool together, expansion of health savings accounts, medical malpractice reform to reduce frivolous lawsuits. this is the republican alternative a
will also talk about the growth of islamic radicalism within the united states. all those topics and your calls, starting tomorrow at 7:00. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . >> here is what is ahead. next, a look at the history of the atomic bomb. then a panel discussion on global security after the fall of the berlin wall. later, a review of the 2008 elections. saturday, a look back at the cuban missile crisis with former kennedy advisers ted sorensen and karaoke secret have war threats been over hyped in the post cold-war world? a university of virginia panel on how the political process has been affected by the internet. and facebook founder chris hughes on how social networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> on this vote, the yeahs are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed to. >> with that vote, the senate moves the health care bill to the floor. starting monday and through december, follow the entire debate, and how the bill would affect access to medical care,
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
is mmitted tohe effort in ahanistan. they're waiting, like the rest of the world i, the united states andhrough president obama to announc our ientions and our way forward. but they have a deep unrstanding of why this is portant for nato, why this important for the larger international communit ani think that given the right meures of accounbility that we need to be seeking from presidenkarzai and his government, we're goingto see a commitment n just from germany but fromany ofur nato allies. >> rose: mightthey makeup whever the gap is between what general mcchrystals seeking and what the united stes is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, ihink we have to wa for th president's announcement. buwe will be, as we have been, consulting very deeplyur ales and talng about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civian strategy. cause, remember it's not ju out troops on theground, it's about making sur that the people of afghastan see the results ofhis efft. that they ha more faithin their own governments of... as an enty thatan deliverfor em.
of denmark, the president of the united states, and some discussions with the chinese president, we have the capacity to lead an agreement at copenhagen. one which deals with the corps policy challenges for the future. namely, what temperature increase are we prepared to sustain in the future? what targets do we need from the major developed economies around the world? what commitment to action do we needrom the major emerging economies like china and india? how do we found this agreement? what kind of climate change process to put in place? if we can land and an outcome of those areas, we will have made a large step forward. and then translating that into legalese will take longer. >> talking about a long by the agreement is not possible? >> will we are talking about is what i would describe as an operational framework agreement. what president obama said the other day, one which would take immediate effect. there's a separation between what is said in a policy agreement, and the difficulty and complexity of translating that into a 4000 page binding legal document. you cannot get to the
are worried about in the united states are getting people back to work. we have 15 million people out of work. our priorities are skewed here. we have things to take care of her at home. why are we worrying about afghanistan? why are we escalating in afghanistan? it's not defensible, not connected to our national security and it really raises questions about the extent of the pentagon's influence on the administration. >> why do you think the president is doing it? many people thought the president came from the same side of the tracks that you're on, generally speaking, in terms of the limits of u.s. power in the world and the need to rejoin the world community and not to be hawkish. what do you make of his decision? why do you think he moved that direction? >> well, i think it's going to be a tough one to defend. and you're right about the -- we've seen the limits of u.s. coercion, and this government in afghanistan is a corrupt government. everyone knows that. sooner or later, the kind of consensus government which afghanistan has had historically is going to have to be reinstituted so peo
between the united states and iran over iran's nuclear program. greg palkot has details. is he live in our london bureau tonight. what are the iranians saying about this. >> a top iranian prosecutor, according oour fox news journalist in tehran is saying that investigation is continuing. a conclusion could come soon and that could mean we are told, formal charges of he is subpoena nage, a trial even reportedly the death penalty for these three americans. we are also monitoring late today ahmadinejad at a press conference and he said and i quote "i'm hopeful that the situation will come out happily happily." then he okay nently claimed that u.s.-backed agencies were trying to kip iranian officials. linkage possible, shep. shepard: what's the reaction from the u.s. government and from their families for that matter? >> it's after noon. the white house and state department condemning the actions of iran. we heard from secretary of state clinton in berlin. she said, and i quote "we believe very strongly there is no evidence for any charge whatsoever." as for the families and the friends, they
into office on a promise of change. including asserting greater independence in dealing with the united states. prime minister yukio hatoyoma has kept that promise, making it clear that japan will no longer allow itself to be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especially on the issue of american military bases. he has gotten washington's attention, and its respect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming once again. in tonight's "lead focus" the president's analysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in japan friday afternoon, tokyo time, the first stop on a four-nation tour that will include singapore, china and south korea. shortly after his arrival, president obama met with the japanese prime minister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on the table, afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in their talks, obama and the prime minister addressed biggest sore spot in u.s./japan relations -- the presence of an air base on okinawa. many japanese are demanding that the base be closed, with protests takin place prior to obama's visit. after today's talks the two lea
, opening up new opportunities for u.s. workers here in the united states of america which is exactly what is being said to president obama as he meets in korea at this moment with their leadership. with president lee and others. so i think that we need to have our attention in this congress focused on the priorities -- the priorities the american people have. fire fighting is very, very important. but again this measure will pass if not unanimously narrowly unanimously and it will do so and i hope get the resources to ensure that we never have the loss of life like those of captain hall and others. but i know from having spoken to their families, mr. speaker, that they believe that the absolutely essential for us to encourage private sector job creation and economic growth and that's why i'm talking about this priority that needs to be addressed here. now, mr. speaker, i'm going to urge my colleagues to defeat the previous question as we move ahead. why? because the issue of reading legislation is another very, very important one that is before us. there is a bipartisan proposal launched
of the united states. finally, i just think it's important to point out someone who remembers working in the white house before the state dinner would happen, it's the entire building is a buzz and it's really a way of sort of literally rolling out the red carpet of the united states to another member of the world community and it's such an important symbolic act. it can't be overstated to show that the united states wants to engage the rest of the world and show the united states respects cultures from around the world and let's not forget the president won by asian americans by a large margin so an important symbol here at home to that community. >> danny, as we wait to see the president and prime minister step out, we know they are behind closed doors and part of the conversation is certainly afghanistan and pakistan. you've got vice president dick cheney coming out critical of the administration saying it was dithering but what about making india a key player in whatever happens in afghanistan regarding the strategy? >> i would have to agree. i think our relationship with india wi
later, after the pentagon papers, erwin griswold, the solicitor general of the united states, who argued the pentagon papers case on behalf of the nixon administration, wrote a story for "the washington post" saying that in fact there was no national security issues whatsoever, and that he as a lawyer had to use every bit of ingenuity and creativity to even make an arguable case pits if anyone wants to read that, i am sure the attorneys in this room would. "the washington post, irwin griswald. you can check out on nexis lexus. no national security issues of all. >> pennsylvania is an elected state at the federal level, as far as appointments. but every once in awhile, it gets played out as to whether pennsylvania should go to some combination -- excuse me -- appointed intellect. i'm going to ask and academic, john, to talk first about that topic. where do you think it should wind up? should it stay the way it is? judges close to home like county judges, are they electable in the sense that people know that? where is it if you go statewide -- or is it if you go statewide? >> at the local
be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that contact that there wa
. in each administration that you work worked, the united states had a difficult time coming up with what phillip zelikow calls a new master script for american fortune policy. if you look at the events, the collapse of the wall and attacks of 9/11, the government did a pretty decent job in the kind of tactical response and cleanup to the immediate after mamath in b situations in terms of unification of germany and germany within nato and after 9/11 in terms of the invasion of afghanistan. where things started to get maybe shaky was in the longer-term plan. in terms of the bush administration 34 did have a doctrine after, a while afternoon 9/11 by the fall of 2002 that seemed to guide things and seemed to be problematic. walter slocombe has discussed how the one strategy the clinton administration did have that was kind of long term led to poor results. eric adelman has made the case that the d.g.p. was a success and guided the administration but as hesitanted at by the questions this morning perhaps part of that focus of that document blinded us to the rise of radical islam and terrorism
celebrate the great and growing partnership between the united states and india. as we all know in india some of life's most precious moments are often celebrated under the cover of a beautiful tent. it's a little like tonight, we have incredible food and music and are surrounded by great friends. for it's been said that the most beautiful things in the universe are the starry heavens above us and the feeling of duty within us. mr. prime minister, today we work to fulfill our duty, bring our countries closer together than ever before. tonight under the stars we celebrate the spirit that will sustain our partnership, the bonds of friendship between our people. it's a bond that includes more than 2 million indian-americans who enrich every corner of our great nation. leaders in government, science, industry and the arts, some of whom join us tonight and the bond of friendship between a president and prime minister who are bound by the same unshakable spirit of possibility in brotherhood that transforms both our nations, the spirit that gave rise to movements led by giants like gandhi and k
are destroying the economy of the united states. this election is going to be interesting to see just tell the public is feeling. host: which races are you watching? caller: it is a foregone conclusion that virginia and creigh deeds ran a terrible campaign. the new york 23rd is traditionally a republican district. it will almost certainly go republican. a democrat has not won since 1850. corzine is a wall streeter. host: you would not bit surprised if corzine loses? the president has been there five times to campaign for him? the >> people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. -- caller: people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. they're not happy with corzine's leadership. host: let's hear from a voter voting in today's new york city mayor's race. who are you going to vote for? caller: thompson. chost: why is that? caller: mayor bloomberg is for the rich. when i went downtown, all the buildings were nothing but luxury buildings. people are getting a rent increase every single year. in one of his commercials, he said that crime is down in new york city. he did not m
to understand the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked, the matters that matter most to our people, nonproliferation, clean energy. these are all issues that have to be part of a joint agenda, and we had a productive discussion about these issues this evening. >> for both countries, ties are critical. japan relies on the u.s. for its security. the you best allies -- the u.s. relies on japan as an ally in an unpredictable area. around this time of year the japanese by could blunt terms. they have been doing these things for centuries. people said it is time for a new relationship with the united states. >> we are gaining maturity and we need more people standing, ying,รง yes, america is not the way. >> i think president obama himself knows we need to respect each other. >> this brief visit is unlikely to resolve the issues between the two countries, including the relocation of a base in okinawa, but president obama is showing that the u.s. still the the use its relationship. >> report from washington over the past few of hours say khalid sheikh mohammed and four other
trafficking is actually done out of the prison system in the united states. particularly the california prison system. and he mentioned one prison, pelican bay, in specific. and then i came back, and i found that there are all these cell phones in prisons which enables a group, name live the mexican mafia, to essentially use cell phones to give directives right out of prisons on hits, on territories, on dealers, and i think this is a very serious thing. i've introduced legislation that would make cell phones contraband in federal prisons with possession punishable by up to an additional year in prison. what do you think of this? what are you doing? it is a real problem, mr. attorney general. >> it is a real problem, senator. i had experience with that when i was the united states attorney here in washington, d.c. rapel edmonds was convicted, sent to jail and continued to run his drug enterprise from prison, was convicted again for that. the maintenance of cell phones in prison, i think, is unacceptable and i think we have to find ways in which we conif i skate them. you're right, they ought to
in the united states, significant announcent? >> yes, defitely. there had been a thoht that the president woulrefrain from putting anything psk on the table until the congre had acted. the house has acted if these numbers are in lin with what the hous has in their bill,ut the senate has just reportedded somethg out of comttee. nothing s reach the floor. so by putting h force behin these numbers, the presint is sort of settingp a negotiating line witthe congress and indicating probably what he feels is the minimu benth whenhesenate shouldn't go and a minimum of wt the world neez needs. a warming of three to four degreesahrenheit puts us in the nger zone as far as global warming is concerned, and these sorts of emissions reductions are consistentwith what we need to get od start combatting th warming. >> suarez: professor, ishat mething new for the united stes, specific ars and specific reduction perntages? >> back in the cnton administration, the u.s. did agree to specifiyears and specic reduction perntages, and they were emdied in the kyoto protocol whh president inton never sent up to t
in afgnistan. they're waiting,ike the rest of the world is, the united states and tough president ama to announce our inttions d our way forward. t they have a deep undetanding of why this is imrtant for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and hink that given the right meases of accountality that we need to be seeking from president rzai and his government,e're going see a commitment notust from germany but from my of o nato allies. rose: might ey make whater the gap is between what general mcchrystal i seeking and what the united stas is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i tnk we have to wait for the president's nouncement. but will be,s we have been, consulting verydeeply o alli and talki about what we want to see from them in order to havehis integrated military and civili strategy. beuse, remember it's not just abt troops on theground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanian see the resultsof ts effor that they have more faith their own government aof... as an entit that c deliver r th. so the needs to be a lot more civi
threat to the united states. >> woodruff: we heard the president say today when the american people hear our rationale, we think they will come along. >> maybe. >> woodruff: that's what he made. >> maybe. a lot of that has to do with the perception of whether the united states can win there and people don't judge the military situation very well. and whether the afghanistan... the people in after dan stan... the afghanistan government can succeed after we've left. there are a a lot of doubts on the part of the public about that. >> woodruff: josh gerstein, pull some of this together. what are the political forces out there weighing on the president? >> here's what i think the basic problem is. it is that we may know by 2011 or 2012 whether the decision the president is about to announce is a success. we may know whether there's better traction for the u.s. mission in afghanistan. we're probably not going to know about the time members of congress face re-election in november of next year. in fact, not all the troops that the president is expected to send there will even be in country by
helped the hijackers reach the united states, then sent them $120 thousand dollars for expenses and flight training. the suspects have been held for as long as 5 years-- at secret sites and at guantanamo-- and have been subjected to harsh interrogations. khalid sheikh mohammed was reportedly water-boarded 183 times in 2003 before the practice was banned. but at today's news conference, attorney general holder said he was sure of convictions. >> the reality is-- and i want to be as assuring as i can-- that, based on all of my experience and based on all of the recommendations and the great work and the research that has been done, that i am quite confident that the outcomes in these cases will be successful ones. >> reporter: and in japan, president obama said he believes the u.s. federal courts are up to the job. >> i am absolutely convinced that khalid sheik mohammad will be subject to the most exacting demands of justice. the american people will insist on it and my administration will insist on it. >> reporter: the idea of bringing the detainees to the u.s. has already run in
that india's partnership with the united states is going to play an influential role in the 21st century. the two leaders discussed several pressing issues, including nuclear deals, climate change as well as the economy. >> mr. president, i bring to you and the people of the united states of america the friendly greetings of over 1 billion people of india. >> as leading economies, the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers, we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> in less than three hours, the president and the first lady will host a state dinner for prime minister singh at the white house. now it's the obamas' first state dinner, and the question, of course, why was india's leader chosen for such an historic honor. our senior foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty explains.
you. >> it is and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states of america. my name is ron summers of the u.s.-india business council. for 34 years we have strived to advance u.s.-india commercial ties. today, what a historic event we have before us. more than ever, the business communities of both our countries are needed to provide an impetus to this important relationship. ladies and gentleman, please stand with me and help me welcome the individuals who are making this possible -- tom donahue, into a newly, ambassador chancre, and the hon. prime minister of india, dr. manmohan singh. [applause] >> thank you very much. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. prime minister singh, ambassadors, distinguished guests, welcome to the united states chamber of commerce. mr. prime minister, we are delighted to be hosting you and your delegation today. we are certain you will have a productive visit to the united states. you are among friends. joining us today are some of the foremost business leaders in america and india. we extend a special welcome to the chair of the
full circle to what we're doing here today in this important g-8 in the capital of the united states. i feel that a failure to articulate a meaningful, a global jewish identity is the biggest threat currently facing the jewish people. [applause] i want to see our people united, joined by global destiny and mission. a small people, but one that is influential and critical to civilization. we are all here today because ugc, the jewish federations of north america, had created a remarkable network with another organization where we can have communications about identity globally and envision tomorrow and create a stronger jewish future. when we do we can deal with the gall stones -- lies and forgeries. i think in this city they are fond of the expression "yes, we can," but this will take board. do not let this be simply a place for schmooze and catch up with friends and colleagues. we have a larger agenda to address. we must be a think tank to create a vision of jewish people for this century. we're here to create a division. who could have imagined that the jew would one day run at one of
nuke, if you will, in the united states, that's just something that's not an acceptable fear. so we're taking a rational, it seems to me, precaution. >> and you write in your piece that u.s. special forces could be used to take control of parts of pakistan's nuclear arsenal in case there was an emergency. just tell us the bare essentials of that plan. how would it work? >> well, as i understand it, in case of a loss of control in a remote area or in me facility, we have offered to the chief of staff of the army through our chairman of the joint chiefs, admiral mullen, we've offered a team that's already in place, a special operations team that's already doing some operations in other areas, helping the pakistanis train and work in afghanistan, we've offered them as a backup. in other words, it's all comity, we're all there to help, we're all big friends together. the only problem, of course, is that the americans are, as you know, as i wrote, are held -- the united states is not very popular in pakistan. and this kind of an agreement, if it became known, as it s become known, it wou
with the united states prior to the war in iraq. the reason we in theory a oppose the war was that we told the bush administration that would blind to that region and we don't underestimate the with them. for you to invade and occupy iraq will be equivalent to pandora's box of evils. you go there and you will unleash evils that we don't understand, all sorts of forest have been unleashed. it's actually run for any country in the world to go and occupy another country, dismantle its government, disbanded government, the spanish police force. and pretend that they know better. you made the decision. you looked to send your troops to iraq and i feel bad for every single human life that was lost in iraq, whether it was iraqi lives or american lives because those young soldiers didn't go there because they wanted to go there. this wasn't a decision taken by the bush administration. not every american situation like the war in iraq. what i'm trying to tell you is this is a controversial issue, but if you try to become part of the lies and forget you are an american and these are iraqis, believe
. there are goals on the table. there's a mission ranges the united states wants to talk b. i think there could be more calibrated areas of success than the cold yes or no that comes in the olympics. and he's going to be one of many heads of states there association the whole dynamic is different. it would be hard for him not to show up, this is a long meeting. he will be there a day to make an address. >> in terms of the rest of the heads of state, there was some issue, the president's going to hit that on december 9, towards the beginning when the majority of the heads of states are coming later in this conference. >> reporter: well, i don't know if that is good or bad but probably it means that he won't be ameshed in some of the inter and intra, multilateral dealings that will go on. but there are going to be many cabinet members coming and going and other high officials from the united states so it's not like there won't be a seat at the table by the united states with a high level official. >> to what extent, john, does this give a conference which had pretty low expectations originally, a
security interests of the united states. there are a lot of people who failed to mention this as an important topic for many years, who have apparently found this country on the map recently. >> asked what bit of information was holding him back, mr. obama said nothing is missing, per se, except a strategy for success in turning around the 8-year-old war. >> i don't think this is a matter of some data or information that i'm waiting on. it is a matter of making certain that when i send young men and women into war, and i devote billions of dollars of u.s. taxpayer money, that it's making us safer. >> the president promised to make his decision, quote, soon, but not before at least one more strategy session. >> i doubt that this is going to be finished again without an additional -- at least an additional meeting. >> analysts say strategic debates deprive u.s. forces of clarity. >> some think these decisions should be made in conference rooms in washington and reevaluating strategy, instead of giving commanders on the ground the ability to make decisions based on situation
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)